Tag Archives: current social news

Google Reader is Gone, What will Replace it? | Social Business News

Google Reader is Gone, What will Replace it? | Social Business NewsAs of today, Google Reader is no longer. But luckily, competing RSS services have developed platforms designed to ease the transition for former Reader users.

What is RSS you ask? Rich Site Summary, or RSS, is a format for delivering regularly changing web content. Many news sites, blogs, and other online publications syndicate their content as an RSS feed in an attempt to deliver immediate updates to those who subscribe to their outlet.

RSS can be a wonderful resource for readers who regularly use the web to stay informed, because the feed provides an orgnazed and convenient way to view the latest content, and current social news. By downloading an RSS reader and adding the sites you frequent most, you can save an immense amount of time because the you does not have to visit each site individually.

Google Reader is Gone, What will Replace it? | Social Business News

Google Reader has been a particularly popular arena for keeping tabs on dozens of social, business, and news websites, and now millions of readers are hoping to find a replacement service.

Fortunately, there are several comparable alternatives to help people track updates from all kinds of websites relating to their jobs, hobbies, or other personal interests. My three favorite are Feedly, Newsblur, and Pulse.

These platforms allow Google Reader users to transfer their feeds over effortlessly by logging in with their Gmail username and password. It is also simple to add new sources to your feeds.

Google Reader is Gone, What will Replace it? | Social Business News

  • Feedly is by far the most popular Google Reader alternative. It has a clean, beautiful interface that you can tweak to work almost exactly like the Google Reader. Its search tool is very effective: you can type in a blog name, a URL or even a topic and get a list of feeds to choose from.

Once you install the Feedly app on your Chrome or Safari browser, it will display a small, transparent button in the lower right corner of your desktop screen. Whenever you browse to a new site that you want to add to your Feedly account, just click that button and it will prompt you to add that site.

Google Reader is Gone, What will Replace it? | Social Business News

  • Newsblur feels a bit more like a desktop reader. You can see stories on the original site, create categories and tags that help highlight the stories you want most, and even create a “blurblog” of all your favorite stories for others to check out.
  • If you’re more of a visual person, Pulse maybe the perfect platform for you. It features a beautiful photo-grid style layout with live tiles that change as new articles are posted to the websites you follow. The site is somewhat reminiscent of the way Pinterest looks because it is almost exclusively image driven. You click on an image, the article expands in front of your eyes and you are able to read a short summary of the article and then decide whether to follow a link to the original piece. Pulse also offers a very effective search tool for finding and adding other feeds. You can organize feeds into categories, and it’s easy to mark the ones you’ve read or the ones you want to save for later.

Google Reader is Gone, What will Replace it? | Social Business News

I wish you luck in finding a new reader platform! While there are plenty more, these are a few of the most popular, and the ones I’d recommend checking out first. If you are ready to give up on RSS feeds altogether, you can follow all of your favorite sites, blogs, and news outlets on Twitter, Google+, and Facebook. Whatever your social content management needs, you’re sure to find something out there that works for you!

 

By Sasha Novikov | Creatine Marketing

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Current Social News | The Global Impacts of Political Networking

Current Social News | The Global Impacts of Political Networking In the past several years the role of social networking in arranging, encouraging, and responding to protest and revolution has been a hot topic of conversation. From Occupy Wall Street to the Arab Spring Revolutions, social media has been at the epicenter of many of the major demonstrations against political corruption. The protests taking place in Turkey add to this trend and are transforming our understanding of how social media can cultivate and fuel public involvement.

Last week authorities assembled outside of Istanbul’s Gezi Park. Surrounding the nucleus of a three-week protest against Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the police shouted muffled warnings, and forcefully moved in.

It was several hours before the commotion ceased, and by then the vast encampment that had been assembled by thousands of protesters was demolished and evacuated. The park had been the focal point for demonstrations, strategy meetings, circulation of current social news, and activity planning− and with Gezi still empty− social media, used considerably in the movement’s adolescence, is more important than ever.

Just a week before the raid, Turkish police arrested over 20 people just for using Twitter to “spread untrue information.” And Erdogan labeled social media “the worst menace to society.” But the people of Turkey consider it more of a critical resource and a civil right− an instrument of revolution and a symbol of the power they hope to take back from corrupt politicians.

Current Social News | The Global Impacts of Political Networking

Civil and political unrest is not unique to Turkey; revolts are erupting all throughout the Middle East. Protesters in nations like Libya, Jordan, Yemen, and Egypt are rising up against the injustices carried out by their governments, hoping that change is on the horizon. Economies are unstable, jobs are non-existent, and the tight-lipped government-run media networks are starving the people of information. The uncertainty, general distrust of the government, and bleak vision of the future create an environment that is ripe with civil unrest and disorder.

Mainstream news, media, and research agencies are failing to cover the demonstrations, and in addition, many nations closely monitor networking outlets to hunt down anyone plotting to lead an uprising. Protesters in other nations are following in the footsteps of Egyptian demonstrators, and are relying on Twitter as a life source and sole communication line to other activists.

People are sharing videos and images on their social networking sites in order to unveil social issues that are rarely discussed in local newspapers or on television programs. Campaigners have posted Vine videos of riots that highlight the asymmetrical violence faced by citizens at the hands of the police− footage that would never have been released to mainstream news outlets.

According to research by NYU Politics Ph.D candidates Pablo Barbera and Megan Metzger, unlike the protests in Egypt however, nearly all of the geo-located tweets in Turkey are coming from within the country. In other words, they explain, social media is a tool for the protesters themselves, not just a medium to show solidarity from citizens abroad.

We are living in a time that is unique in history, this is the first time in human existence that people can tweet, blog, post, and interact across networks and across the globe−and the latest development in communication is the use of social media to share and discuss news of dissatisfaction with the political state of your nation. While many people in the United States are of the opinion that Twitter, Facebook, and other networks can be used as tools in maintaining an honest democracy, other nations are struggling to exercise what we recognize as our First Amendment right.

 

By Sasha Novikov | Creatine Marketing

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